Music-Online

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/hviiuefp/public_html/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.

Ndegeocello single release by Warner as 99-cent MP3

A Warner Music Group subsidiary released a single as an unprotected MP3 file -- a remixed version of the song "Earth" by Meshell Ndegeocello, a genre-defying artist. The company initially released a few hundred copies of the remix on vinyl to dance-club disc jockeys, but the 99-cent MP3 version is the only format widely available to consumers. (LA Times/registration required)

The Wizard of Oz at Napster? It was Bertelsmann

San Jose Mercury News reporter Dawn Chmielewski looked up the court papers in the Napster bankruptcy filing -- and found that Napster was dependent on big-five label Bertelsmann for more than a year -- and still Napster doesn't have an operating file-sharing system which respects copyright.

Is AOL working on innovation in streaming to sack Real?

AOL is reported by CNET News and by AOL-owned Fortune Magazine to be working on technology which could cut the cost of producing Internet streaming audio and undermine Real Networks. "Ultravox" is said to be "supercharged network routers capable of moving large media files far more efficiently" than at present.

OPINION: Why small webcasters will suffer from new royalty rates

Famed music critic David Marsh provides his insight into why last week's decision by the Library of Congress to set per-song webcasting royalty rates at seventy cents per one-thousand plays will destroy micro-webcasting.

Terra Lycos' Rhapsody promises access to 10,000 albums

The service won't let you burn CDs until the partner offering it, Listen.COM, reworks license agreements with labels. The basic cost is $4.95 a month for access to 20 FM_quality online "radio-station" streamcasts, writes Teri Robinson of E-Commerce Times.

Report claims Kazaa insecure, but users oblivious

HP Labs research finds the file-swapping service Kazaa is rife with security holes and can share all of a user's hard-drive files without the user knowing it, reports Elizabeth Millard of NewsFactor Network.
Syndicate content