Information Technology

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Competing electronic paper solutions from MIT and PARC outlined at website

The concept of electronic paper (or digital paper) -- a thin display which can be viewed in daylight, retains data without power and is flexible enough to be stashed in a handbag -- has been a goal of technologists for two decades. A resource page at the PARC research center in Palo Alto provides links to information about competing technologies being gradually commercialized -- one from MIT, the other from PARC. ---- >

Competing elecronic paper solutions from MIT and PARC outlined at website

The concept of electronic paper -- a thin display which can be viewed in daylight, retains data without power and is flexible enough to be stashed in a handbag -- has been a goal of technologists for two decades. A resource page at the PARC research center in Palo Alto provides links to information about competing technologies being gradually commercialized -- one from MIT, the other from PARC. ---- >

Media Center and Institute for New Media Studies offer site with 22 essays on "digital storytelling"

Tom Regan of the Online News Association reports that Nora Paul's Institute for New Media Studies at the University of Minnesota, and Andrew Nachison's Media Center at the American Press Institute has launched a new project, called "Digital Think". It's a collection of essays written by 22 interesting new media/digital media producers, educators, artists, journalists. There is a gateway website and a book version. To launch directly, click HERE. INMS hopes to add more to the website and possibly do a new collection of essays next year.

Digital paper slims down and moves closer to commercial viability

After a decade or more of development "electronic paper" -- (also known as digital paper) -- an ultra-thin plastic sheet containing tiny particles which respond to electric charges to create images -- appears to be getting closer to commercial viability. Observers think this could usher in an era of display devices which can be rolled and folded and read in sunlight. Reuters' Niclas Mika has the he story via CNET-NEWS.
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