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Michael Maness
VP / New Media
Wilmington News-Journal
Wilmington, DE

http://www.delawareonline.com/webcast.html

Wilmington, DE 00000


"I wanted to do something that combined the immediacy of TV with the depth of the newspaper and the interactivity of the Internet . . .That's what we tried to come up with: News from the future, what would it look like? Let's do it now."

(from http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ep/20041217/en_bpiep/watchingthenewspaperontheweb)


Summary:
newspaper with no TV affiliate doing webcasts

BELOW EXCERPTED FROM: http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ep/20041217/en_bpiep/watchingthenewspaperontheweb:

As broadband Internet access spreads, newspaper Web sites, bored with just words, are adding video clips and even, at a trendsetting Delaware paper, TV-style newscasts.

NEW YORK -- Never mind the plain old written words you find in plain old dead-tree newspapers. On newspapers' Web sites, the next big thing will likely be TV-style video news reports.

Online editors at newspapers across the country are looking to add video clips, video reports, and even online TV newscasts to their sites, taking advantage of the recently exploding popularity of broadband Internet access.

Kinsey Wilson, editor in chief of USAToday.com, calls "continued, expanded use of video, and real experimentation around how video is best deployed on the Internet" the top trend to watch on newspaper Web sites in 2005.

. . .

The front-running newspaper in terms of video on the Web is likely The News Journal in Wilmington, Del., which runs a new, three-minute newscast, produced by the newspaper and featuring an anchorwoman on the paper's staff, twice each day.

"We've been doing video on the site for almost three years now," says Michael Maness, vice president of new media at the paper. At first they'd run what Maness calls "featurey stuff" -- they'd send a photographer to record a few minutes of footage at a breaking-news event or they'd buy footage from a news service, and they'd include the video clips alongside a news story on the site. Delaware has no local broadcast stations of its own, so area residents soon learned to come to the News Journal site for breaking news, with traffic growing about tenfold from February 2003 to February 2004.

The new webcast launched in October of this year. "I wanted to do something that combined the immediacy of TV with the depth of the newspaper and the interactivity of the Internet," Maness says. "That's what we tried to come up with: News from the future, what would it look like? Let's do it now."