Blogs

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My Citizen Journalism Experience

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Click here to read the full blog post about Jeff Engmann's experience with the website BleacherReport.com.  Engmann is a student intern for the MGP.

I began writing for the website in May of 2008. Initially I approached the website timidly. After all, I was going to school to earn my right to write, while this website unrepentantly blurs the line between journalist and blogger. But somehow, some way, it’s become a notable display of controlled anarchy (well, in writing terms).

NYU students and Jay Rosen judge "best blogs" among U.S. newspapers over 100,000 circulation

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Students of New York University journalism professor Jay Rosen rated the nation's best newspaper-related bogs in a writing package posted at the school's Blue Plate Special website. ---- >

Debate of whether bloggers are journalists is over, Jay Rosen writes

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In an essay he wrote for the Blogging, Journalism & Credibility conference Jan. 21-22, 2005, in Cambridge, Mass., New York University Prof. Jay Rosen wrote: "Bloggers vs. journalists is over. I don't think anyone will mourn its passing."

As blogs become marketing must for business, consultants offer advice

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Corporate America is recognizing the value of weblogs for communicating with customers. As a result, consultants are offering advice on best practices. One such consultant to corporate blogs is Charlene Li at Forrester Research.

Are blogger's journalists? Some links to the subject

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New Communications Blogzine asks: "Are bloggers journalists?" and provides some help links to answers.

Are bloggers journalists?

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Chris Daly, a journalism professor at Boston University, looks at blogs from the point of view of the founding fathers, keeping in mind the spirit in which the first amendment was written. Daly compares blogs to the revolutionary writings, like Common Sense, that brought the United States into being, saying that blogs should, for the most part, be entitled to "the full constitutional blessings that the First Amendment guarantees." [ Visit Website ]

Much ado about blogging

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Is it the end of journalism as we know it? Or just 6 zillion writers in search of an editor? Neither. Scott Rosenberg on Salon.com writes about the growing blog phenomenon--what they are and how they impact journalism.

No Blogs, No Chat, No Web Fun

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Cincinnati is banning city employees' at-work access to blogs as well as the Web sites of local radio stations and "adult content" sites, writes Gregory Korte Enquirer staff writer. Not banned: Web sites of racist groups.

Don't be afraid of blogs, OJR editor advises

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Media companies shouldn't be afraid of blogs, says Online Journalism Review editor Michelle Nicolosi. "More papers should think about setting up reporters with blogs. Working on them should be optional -- not mandated -- and reporters should be given the freedom to have a little personlity in their blog, to link offsite, to post pretty much as they see fit. If they do a bad job, cancel it. But if you try to control it too much, the blog will not really be a blog -- it'll be briefs. Newspaper style briefs are boring. They don't have the same appeal and won't draw the same kind of crowd as a personality-driven insider's look at a given topic."
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